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The Survival Debate is back.   If you had to choose between the Henry Arms AR-7 Survival Rifle or the Springfield Armory M6 Scout Survival Rifle, which would you choose and why?  Both are great survival rifles but which one will the fans of SurvivalCache pick? Springfield Armory M6 Scout Survival Rifle Pros Limited moving parts – very little to go wrong with this rifle/shotgun Steel construction 2 Barrels / 2 Types of ammo – . 410 shotgun & .

Survival Debate: AR-7 or M6 Survival Rifle

Survival Debate: AR-7 or M6 Survival RifleThe Survival Debate is back.  If you had to choose between the Henry Arms AR-7 Survival Rifle or the Springfield Armory M6 Scout Survival Rifle, which would you choose and why?  Both are great survival rifles but which one will the fans of SurvivalCache pick? Springfield Armory M6 "Scout Survival Rifle" Pros Limited moving parts – very little to go wrong with this rifle/shotgun Steel construction 2 Barrels / 2 Types of ammo – .410 shotgun & .22LR Ammo storage in butt stock Trigger works well with gloves Shotgun….need we say more? Cons Spartan Construction – uncomfortable to shoot Difficult to reload No semi-automatic fire – must reload each barrel Packing system not ideal Pin that joins the lower/upper receiver could be Achilles heel if lost No longer manufactured – have to buy used Henry Arms US Survival AR-7 Rifle Pros Easy to shoot – good ergonomics (for a Survival Rifle) 8 round clip (2 of them – 16 rounds total) Semi-automatic fire Limited moving parts Rifle disassembles into water resistant butt stock Blaze orange front site post Floats Cons Disassembled AR-7 and M-6 Scout .22LR provides limited power Only shoots one type of ammo ABS Plastic Construction No shotgun SurvivalCache.com Video Review SurvivalCache Team Vote Mr. Smashy – M6 Scott – M6 Joel – AR-7 James – AR-7 Mike – AR-7 Captain Bart – M6 Josh – M6 Jimmy – AR-7 Greg – M6 Please join in the debate below Photos by: The SurvivalCache.com Team Other interesting articles: PDW – Do You Really Need One? 2020 Debate M6 Scout Survival Rifle Review for 2020 Survival Gear Review: Henry US Survival AR-7 Rifle S&W 15-22 vs Ruger 10/22: Survival Rifle Debate for 2020

Gun Review: Ruger P345

Gun Review: Ruger P345

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379ce1b85d5_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379ce1b85d5_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Solid on performance and reasonably priced, the Ruger P345 is not new but it is an autoloader any serious handgunner should check out. Through my decades-long involvement with the shooting sports I have noted a trend.  A new centerfire autoloading pistol is introduced with a lot of fanfare, and it appears on the covers of magazines.  The articles inside tout its function, accuracy, durability, and ergonomics.  The cycle is repeated with a new model, and the previously praised pistol passes into oblivion.  I guess that is progress, and seems to stand as one of the rules of American marketing, but some models should not be forgotten. Find Out More About Ruger Firearms Introduced almost exactly six years ago, the Ruger P345 is just such a pistol.  Ruger’s first .45 auto, the P97 was introduced in 1997 and was praised as a durable, compact lightweight piece that featured a polymer frame.  One published test even claimed that 5,000 rounds were fired in one without a failure of any kind.  But the P97 was thought by some to be ugly, and it was not considered to be the equal of a SIG, Glock, Kimber, or a 1911 clone. I have had mine for about seven years and have never had a misfire or stoppage of any kind.  The good news is that it cost me exactly $350 at the time I bought it new.  No, it is not the most elegant autoloader I have.  That title belongs to a Smith & Wesson 4506. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! But time marches on and Ruger replaced the P97 with the P345 in 2004.  Although there are similarities between the two, there are also many differences.  The P345 has three features that make it in compliance with restrictions in states that are unfriendly to handguns.  First, it has a loaded chamber indicator.  When a cartridge is in the chamber, a small bar pivoted at the rear is forced upward so the leading end rises out of a recess in the top of the slide, and two red dots and the word “loaded” become visible.  Second, the P345 has a magazine disconnect so it will not fire with the magazine removed.  Third, there is a key-activated lock that is accessed through a hole in the right hand safety lever when the safety lever is in the on position.  These safety features bring praise from some and disdain from others.  Many shooters will ignore the first two and never activate the third. Related GunDigest Articles Ruger Gallery: Six Decades of Good Gun Designs Gun Review: The Turnbull Ruger Mark IV Video: Ruger Redhawk .45 Colt Review The exterior appearance of the P345 shows significant improvement over that of the P97, which does look somewhat like a blob.  The P345 is slightly thinner and weighs 1.5 ounces less than the P97.  The grip of the P345 has a better configuration than that of the P97, and has molded in sharp checkering rather than a slick surface.  My P97 has worn a Hogue Handall® sleeve for years, but that won’t be necessary for the P345. Some years ago, I had admired the P345 from a distance, but when I held one I knew it was just a matter of time.  Did I need the P345?  Absolutely not, but since I interact well with most firearms, it seemed necessary.  When I talked to my favorite dealer who also owns and runs the range where I shoot, the price he quoted made me realize that I had made the right decision. So now that I have both a P97 and a P345, my impression is that they get no respect, but they certainly deserve it.  The P345 feels as good in my hand as does any other autoloading pistol.  At 29 ounces, it rides easily and points quickly.  Being only 7.5 inches in length, it is a compact pistol but still features a 4.2 inch barrel.  My old Ruger is the P97DC with the decocking levers, but the P345 has dual safety levers that also function as decocking levers. The P345 features dual safety levers that also function as decockers. Sights on the P345 are low and they can be moved laterally for windage adjustment.  White dots on either side of the notch in the rear sight can be aligned quickly with one on the rear face of the front sight.  The P345 is currently available with either a blue or stainless steel slide mated to the black polymer frame.  To me, it has the most eye appeal of any Ruger autoloader yet.  The grooves on the slide are sharp and give a good grip, and the conventional styled hammer is much more comfortable to the thumb than the style found on the P97 that had a sharp edge at the top. Disassembly of the P345 is simple.  After removing the magazine, draw the slide and lock it. Rotate the ejector pin downward in the magazine well.  This unlocks the slide which is moved forward until the index mark on the slide is aligned with one on the frame.  With the slide held firmly in that position, push the slide lock lever to the left and remove it from the frame.  Move the slide forward to remove it and the barrel assembly from the frame.  With the slide inverted, the recoil spring and guide rod can be separated from the barrel by lifting upward at the rear to separate the assembly from the barrel.  The barrel can then be lifted at the rear and slid backward out of the slide. World history has included the Stone, Bronze, and Iron ages, we are now in the Polymer Age.  We now have plastic bumpers for cars, plastic joints for knee replacement, and plastic frames for handguns.  Advanced composites are so versatile that most manufacturers of handguns produce models with polymer frames.  Ruger has done this quite successfully with the P97, P345, and other models.  The result is a durable, lightweight pistol that has excellent ergonomics and durability. At the range, the P345 proved to be utterly reliable and handled very well. Why is the P345 not more highly regarded and in greater demand?  I do not believe it lacks durability, reliability, looks, or accuracy because it has all of these in large measure.  Perhaps it is because the Ruger name was so closely identified with .22s, single-shot and bolt-action rifles, and single-action revolvers for so long.  Entering the highly competitive centerfire autoloader market rather late made Ruger the new kid on the block and shooters who had used other brands for so long simply turned noses upward and yawned.  Moreover, some of the Ruger models, quite frankly, lacked the refinement of some competitors, and there is a plethora of models from which to choose. For many of us, the question of how a pistol performs is paramount.  Having always been pleased with my P97, I am pleased to say that the newer P345 performs at least as well and possibly better.  However, with a handgun held in quivering hands and sights aligned by imperfect eyes, accuracy is more an aspect of the shooter than of the handgun.  However, the accompanying photo shows a couple of the three-shot groups made by my P345 that measure less than 2 inches at 25 yards. The Ruger has sufficient accuracy for any application that is appropriate for a pistol of this type.  The assessment of durability will have to wait until I do a lot more shooting, but function has been perfect with both factory ammunition and my handloads.  To date, the best accuracy has been with a 230-grain Rainier Ballistics bullet pushed by 6.1 grains of Alliant Unique. Is my Ruger P345 the equal of my S&W 4506?  Absolutely not, but I am not sure what .45 autoloader is.  But with the MSRP of $577 and $617 for the blue and stainless versions, the P345 should be considered as a competent, relatively inexpensive autoloader for defensive uses. The usual retail prices are about $100 below the MSRP, and I consider the P345 a very good value.  It comes with two magazines, a magazine loader, a large external lock, and a hard case.  Centerfire autoloaders are the hot handguns so I just hope that the Ruger P345 gets the respect it deserves before it becomes one of those highly praised pistols that passes quietly into oblivion. This article appeared in the December 6, 2010 issue of Gun Digest the Magazine . Get More Ruger Info: Great Ruger Guns Ruger No. 1 Ruger Precision Rifle Ruger Redhawk Ruger Super Redhawk Ruger Blackhawk Ruger Single Six Ruger 10/22 Ruger LCR Ruger LCRx Ruger 77/22 Ruger 77/44 Ruger SR1911 Ruger Hawkeye Ruger Mark IV Ruger SR-556 Ruger LCP II Ruger American Magnum Ruger American Rifle Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle Ruger SR-762 Ruger Red Label Ruger SR40 Ruger Single Nine We Found Bulk Ammo In Stock: Ammo from $14.60 creedmoorsports.com Ammo Sale from $6.99 brownells.com Disclosure: These links are affiliate links. "Caribou Media Group" earns a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! NEXT STEP: Download Your Free Storm Tactical Printable Target Pack 62 Printable MOA Targets with DOT Drills - Rifle Range in YARDS This impressive target pack from our friends at Storm Tactical contains 62 printable targets for rifle and handgun range use. Target grids and bullseye sizes are in MOA. Ideal for long-range shooting! Get Free Targets

Best Rifle Reviews To Help You Take Aim At A Top Iron (2019)

Best Rifle Reviews To Help You Take Aim At A Top Iron (2019)

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379da4199d4_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379da4199d4_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Thinking about putting a hot new rifle under the tree this Christmas for your favorite shooter? Find the perfect bullseyes driller for them with our best rifle reviews, lists and videos from 2019. The Yuletide season is also gun-buying season. Contrary to what some news organizations say, gun enthusiasts spend money at a record-breaking pace this time of year stocking up on rifles, pistols and shotguns. What better gift? Even if it happens to be a personal holiday present for yourself. It’s understandable why this time of year the smell of gun oil has become as common as the aroma of gingerbread. For the next two months or so, gun retailers cook some of the most rock-solid deals you’re likely to come by for the next 365 days. While most are money savers, not every hot buy is worth the coin. Not every gun makes the perfect gift, especially for shooters champing at the bit to unwrap a particular make and model. We’re here to help make certain you don’t come up short with your high-velocity stocking stuffer this year. We’ve compiled our 22 best rifle reviews, lists and videos from 2019 to give you a solid handle on the hot tack drivers out today. So, whether it’s a functional masterpiece from Turnbull, a hair-splitting accurate 6.5 Creedmoors or a trophy-hanging hunter from Sauer—it’s all here. 10 New, On-Target Rifles (2019) There’s no shortage of new rifles for 2019, with models designed for short- and long-distance. Here’s a quick look. Top 12 Affordable Precision Rifles — Bolt-Action Edition (2019) Precision rifles can cost you an arm and a leg, but there are top-notch and highly accurate options that will still leave you with money for ammunition. Related GunDigest Articles Best Pistol Reviews To Find A Superb Semi-Auto (2019) Best Gun Gear Reviews To Find That Perfect Piece Of Kit (2019) Best Revolver Reviews To Help Pick The Right Wheelgun (2019) Top 17 Sharp-Shooting 6.5 Creedmoor Rifles (2019) Choices abound when it comes to top 6.5 Creedmoor rifles. Here are some of the best to get the red-hot round dead on target. Check Out Other Review Roundups: Best Pistol Reviews To Find A Superb Semi-Auto Best Revolver Reviews To Help Pick "The Right Wheelgun" Best Gun Gear Reviews To "Find That Perfect" Piece Of Kit 8 Affordable 9mm Carbine Options (2019) Test the waters with these economical 9mm carbine options. 12 New Top Remington Rifles That Are On Target (2019) Big Green is still kicking and turning out top firearms. Here are 12 Remington rifles worth keeping your eye out for in 2019. Does The Howa KRG Bravo Hit The Mark? Combined with a Nightforce ATACR 4-16×42 F1 Scope, the Howa KRG Bravo smashed expectations. The Sako Model 85 Bavarian Sako’s Model 85 Bavarian sports a very unique action and stock combination that pair exceptionally well for in-field accuracy. The 300-Yard MOA Test Of The Sauer Model 100 Affordability + Performance = Sauer Model 100 In 6.5 PRC. Video: Turnbull’s Stunning Winchester 1892 Deluxe Takedown Finished to period-correct specifications, Turnbull's "Winchester 1892 Deluxe" Takedown is a wall-hanger you've got to shoot. Steyr Scout Rifle In 6.5 Creedmoor The 6.5 Creedmoor has swept the rifle world, but is its performance up to snuff in the multi-purpose Steyr Scout rifle?

[Review+Video] Faxon Bantam 9mm PCC: Glock Mags, LRBHO, & Indestructible

[Review+Video] Faxon Bantam 9mm PCC: Glock Mags, LRBHO, & Indestructible

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Yet another pistol caliber carbine up on the chopping block – but what sets this one apart, and why should you care? Well, it runs for one – and it may well be just about unkillable? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ blap. Check out the full video below, or read on for more! Table of Contents Loading... Bantam PCC When it comes to selecting a pistol caliber carbine, it seems like just about every manufacturer you can think of has a 9mm AR-style offering . Faxon Bantam 9mm PCC 975 at Faxon Firearms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 975 at Faxon Firearms Prices accurate at time of writing And somehow, they all profess to reinvent the wheel with some kind of new game-changing feature. Even though we’re still fans of NFA’s side-charging 9mm uppers. While that’s to be expected considering firearms technology has essentially plateaued and there’s likely not going to be any radical departures from existing gun dogma until we get like… plasma rifles or whatever. There’s still something to be said for doubling down on what’s arguably one of the most important aspects of functional gun design – reliability. Coming soon. Maybe. Faxon has cut their teeth on high quality barrels for a ton of different platforms, and that’s essentially the centerpiece of their 9mm Bantam AR-15 style pistol caliber carbine. Perhaps most notably, this is the barrel that Iraq Veteran 8888 attempted to kill with 5,000 rounds of 9mm on a full auto lower… and couldn’t . BEHOLD Although our own testing was nothing near that rigorous, we put this little hitter through its paces and are likewise pretty damn pleased with the results. Range Report You know the drill – if you’ve handled an AR-15 or an AR-9 before you’re going to be in pretty familiar territory here. You know, considering it’s essentially the same thing. The gun runs on everyone’s favorite dumb meme – you guessed it, Glock mags! Featuring direct blowback carbon-scoring goodness 😎 Get yourself some here…BIG STICKS. Glock OEM Magazines (All Capacities) 25 at Gun Mag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 25 at Gun Mag Warehouse Compare prices (2 found) Gun Mag Warehouse (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing We also had no issues with feeding or ejection across a variety of different brands. Including the legendarily shitty Winchester Forged chalky, steel-cased 9mm that runs so poorly, folks sometimes recommend lubricating the casings themselves in order to facilitate proper function. Pictured: 😬 Yeah, they’re really that bad — but the Bantam chows down on that stuff like a basement-dwelling gun dork inhales rubbery, microwaved tendies. Winchester Forged 115gr 9mm 29 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 29 at Lucky Gunner Compare prices (2 found) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing We shot a series of groups with a few different types of 9mm at 25 yards, and are pretty pleased! Blazer 124 Grain Group Everything from Blazer 124gr , to Federal American Eagle 115gr , to Federal Hydrashok HST 147gr grouped decently in our books, save for a flyer or two. "Federal American Eagle" 115 Grain Group Ultimately, it’s a 9mm pistol caliber carbine – you’re not really going to be stretching the legs on this bad boy or driving tacks with it, but performance wise it’s perfectly acceptable for what we do. Federal Hydrashok HST 147 Grain Groups Best 9mm Self-Defense (147 gr) Federal HST 9mm 147 gr 22 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 22 at "Palmetto State Armory" Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Weirdly enough, Faxon doesn’t mention any details regarding the trigger itself, but it does feel quite a bit nicer than your standard milspec fare to me. A lot of information to be gleamed from this still photo of a thing in motion, surely. You’ve got an almost negligible amount of takeup before a nice clean break and a loud, audible reset. Not entirely sure what exact trigger this is, but consider me a fan! The gun’s reasonably lightweight overall – about what you’d expect, but we tossed on a Cloud Defensive OWL for cool guy points and that chunky ass light is going to add a little bit of heft upfront. We dig it. Cloud Defensive OWL 390 at Optics Planet Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 390 at Optics Planet Compare prices (3 found) Optics Planet (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Primary Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing We’ll finish up our review of it soon but in the meantime check out Best AR-15 Lights . You’ve got a pretty standard M-Lok handguard with a pic rail up top, and slots cut at the 3, 6, and 9 positions, and QD sling attachment points on the right and left sides of the forward most portion of the rail. Nothing out of the ordinary, really. We’ve actually got a bit of a specialized setup here that features a 16” barrel with an integrated muzzle brake, but the gun ships from Faxon with a standard A2 Birdcage style flash hider. The integrated brake itself. While not catastrophic by any means, the Bantam also comes with an older LE style stock and A2 pistol grip. But for the price point of about $950 or so, we’d definitely like to see a some nicer furniture paired with the gun considering how absolutely out-dated A2 accessories are at this point. Mehhhh. In a world where Magpul CTR and MOE accessories are generally the standards, it feels a bit odd to have some older parts slapped on what feels like a much more modern gun design. But obviously this is easily rectifiable. The Bantam also features a skeletonized… brass deflector… for reasons? We’re not complaining per se, but it does feel a bit akin to putting a racing stripe on a completely stock Civic. but y tho Lastly, the gun’s got a specialized magazine release that operates a bit more as a fulcrum than the standard press-in style of a traditional AR-15. This release is also different than the New Frontier Armory or PSA designs that tend to be the norm on PCCs. A good shot of the lever itself. The paddle-style release does appear to help with both retention and mag dropping with Glock style magazines. Brutally Tested Budget Red Dot Sig Sauer Romeo5 149 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 149 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Thankfully, the Bantam’s bolt does lock back reliably on an empty mag – a feature that many PCCs choose to bypass, but a functional addition that we find useful. more blap. By The Numbers Reliability: 5/5 We had zero issues with feeding or ejection during our testing sesh with the Bantam, and it guzzled down less than stellar quality 9mm with ease. Again, while we certainly didn’t attempt to run this thing into the ground like others have, we’re pretty confident that this boy’s going to continue to run without issue. Accuracy: 4/5 While our group results aren’t anything too crazy impressive, your most likely use-case scenario for something like a 16″ 9mm AR is probably in the realm of casual competition runs, a varmint gun, or plain old-fashioned plinking. Considering those parameters? Works for us ! Ergonomics: 4/5 It’s essentially an AR, so to a certain extent, the ergonomics are up to you. While we’re not huge fans of the A2 grip or LE stock, those can be swapped out quite easily. Other than that, it’s what you’d expect from an AR-platform rifle. Looks: 3/5 Once more, nothing too crazy to comment on here, but if you’re a fan of AR type guns with the distinctive silhouette of a big stick of 9mm protruding from the bottom, you’re going to be pretty stoked on the Bantam. It certainly isn’t as flashy as some of the other, higher speed PCCs on the market, but presumably, that’s not what you’re interested in if you’re considering this gun. Customization: 5/5 As with any AR-type platform, the world is essentially your oyster when it comes to upgradeability! Pretty much any part you might want to swap out is readily able to do so, from the muzzle device, handguard, pistol grip, stock, and many of the internal bits and bobs as well. A no brainer. Bang for the Buck: 4/5 While a 9mm AR can certainly be had for a little bit less from other manufacturers, we’d say the Bantam is still pretty reasonably priced for the level of performance and reliability you’re getting out of it. Faxon Bantam 9mm PCC 975 at Faxon Firearms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 975 at Faxon Firearms Prices accurate at time of writing Overall: 4/5 Conclusion While priced slightly higher than some other 9mm PCCs, the Faxon Bantam offers proven reliability, good accuracy, and last round bolt hold open (LRBHO). We’d recommend swapping out the furniture to newer stuff but overall the Bantam is great for a self-defense or even competition pistol caliber rifle. Overall, if you’re looking into picking up a 9mm rifle in the familiar shape of the AR-15, to us it makes a bit of sense to snag something that’s going to last as you use and abuse it. Like so Considering direct blowback PCCs tend to run dirty as hell, you’ll also probably want one that’s nice enough to where upgrading it when the time comes makes sense. For us, the Faxon Bantam 16” ticks both of those boxes pretty nicely, and if you want a plinky boi that’ll run on glock mags – this might just be the gat for you. nyoooom. What do you think about the Bantam? Not quite sure what PCC to get? Check out our Best Pistol Caliber AR-15s .

Gun Review: .223 Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f377cd295465_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f377cd295465_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle, a concept envisioned by Col. Jeff Cooper, is reintroduced as a do-it-all shooter in another versatile caliber. The 16.1-inch barrel wears a flash hider that comes off, making room for other barrel attachments. Notice the black blade front sight that is well protected. Author photo Consider this: After getting a rough zero through an extended eye relief scope mounted on Ruger’s new version of the Gunsite Scout rifle chambered in .223 Remington, I leveled it at a couple of clay trap targets at 200 yards and what I didn’t hit, the misses were so close as to be negligible had I been shooting at a coyote or anything bigger. That’s one very good rifle. Originally introduced in .308 Winchester, as the late Col. Jeff Cooper envisioned this concept, the Scout, as Cooper dubbed his rifle, is a short-action model on which a long eye relief scope is mounted just ahead of the action. It was and remains a good idea, but just because the original concept was a .30-caliber model doesn’t mean that is chiseled in stone. Find Out More About Ruger Firearms Let’s be honest. The .223 Rem. isn’t my first choice for a defensive or offensive rifle caliber, but it’s not too shabby for urban challenges or rural survival. It shoots flat and accurately, has very light recoil, ammunition can be found just about anywhere, and somebody who knows what he’s doing can neck-break deer-sized game all day with the right load. Against predators, the .223 is devastating, and I doubt anyone could give a reasonable estimate on the number of prairie dogs, rock chucks and other varmints that have been put away with those little bullets. It has also been proven in combat as a fight stopper. The Scout Rifle Concept My test model had a matte black finish on the 16.1-inch medium contour barrel and receiver, a single 10-round magazine that proved itself to be tough as nails, a black laminate stock with QD sling swivel studs and a straight comb and a Mini-14-style protected-post front sight and adjustable ghost ring rear. That rear sight may be removed to mount a scope in the conventional over-the-action position, and Ruger supplied the rings to accomplish that task. They fit into the integral scope mounts that are machined into the steel receiver. There are a total of four models: black matte and stainless are available for both left- and right-handed shooters. Related GunDigest Articles Video: A Look at the Ruger Scout Rifle in 5.56 New Gun: Ruger American Ranch Rifle in 7.62x39mm New Gun: Ruger AR-556 MPR (Multi-Purpose Rifle) The one-piece stainless steel bolt contrasts handsomely with the matte black finish, and the bolt head is smooth to allow for fast cycling. Ruger designers also included a three-position safety that works smoothly with a positive click. It also comes with a Picatinny-style rail mounted ahead of the action, holding true to Cooper’s original concept. The barrel is cut with six lands and grooves on a 1:8 right-hand twist and ends with a flash suppressor. The flash suppressor can be removed, exposing the ½-inch 28 threads so other accessories can be mounted. Overall, the rifle hits the scale at just over 7 pounds. That may seem on the heavy side, especially among folks who like the AR-type platform to launch .223 Rem. bullets, but this is one tough little bolt-action carbine that could survive a catastrophe and still deliver the goods. It bounced around in my pickup for a few days while driving off road and was no worse for wear. Ruger mounted a nice, thick, soft rubber recoil pad on the butt and supplies three 1/2-inch spacers to adjust the stock to an individual’s length of pull preference, from 123⁄4 inches to 141⁄4 inches. That puts the overall length from 37 to 381⁄2 inches. It’s also got a tough glass-reinforced trigger guard and Mini-14-type paddle magazine release, and the stock is checkered on the curved grip and forend. Out-of-the Box Accuracy The black laminate stock is rugged and appears to have something of an urban camo appearance. Ruger fits this rifle with a thick recoil pad. Author photo During my first range session, I used the metallic sights exclusively. Right out of the box, I put several rounds into the X-ring in tight little groups. That got my attention, so I stuck on a Bushnell long-eye relief scope I’ve had for a couple of years, returned to the range, did a rough adjustment at close range and knowing how flat the .223 shoots, put the crosshairs on a couple of clays that someone had stuck in the sand on the 200-yard berm. Cracking those clays came as a bit of a surprise, even with a flat-shooting round like the .223. I wish I’d had a more powerful scope on the rifle just to see how precise I could make those 200-yard shots.

Introduction to Long Range Shooting

I have been practicing long range shooting for about ten years. When I bought my first scoped rifle, initially, for deer and wild boar hunting, I began to research and study material about rifle marksmanship, ballistics, and handloading. My intent was to be able to deliver the most accurate and effective shots possible at typical hunting distances (up to ~300yds). I soon discovered that with rifles just like mine, ordinary civilians were shooting at 1000yds, and beyond. I found those subjects fascinating, and the more I learned, the more I wanted to know. With this series of articles, I want to share what I’ve discovered in my research (and range experience). Let’s start with these questions: what is long range shooting and what does it take to make a shot at long range? Long Range Shooting For these articles, we can speak of long range shooting as ranges of 500-600yds, and beyond. Shooting at such distances makes seemingly small factors, such as your heart rate, breathing, physics, and the effects weather, more significant. This adds to the challenge, which, for me, is part of the beauty of this discipline. What does it take to make a long range shot? Some of you may recognize this quote from the movie Shooter (2007): “You know what it takes to make a shot at that range? Everything comes into play that far. Humidity elevation, temp, winds, spin drift. There’s a 6-10 second flight time, so you have to shoot it where the target’s going to be. Even the coriolis effect, the spin of the earth, comes into play.” They were talking about a shot beyond one mile; however, these elements are still relevant for long distance shooting at closer ranges. There is a bit more involved, including some physics, a little trigonometry, and a few formulas to use for long distance shooting. This math stuff may sound nasty for some of you, but rest assured that’s nothing of too difficult, once you get familiar with it. I’m not a fan of mathematics, so I’ll try to keep it simple. The only other things you need are a willingness to learn, the discipline (and practice) to apply it. Oh, and a rifle, of course! Speaking of rifles, you may think you need a super-precision-laser rifle, with an astronomical telescope mounted on it chambered in a powerful caliber to shoot long range… You don’t. There are budget solutions, and ways to set up your existing rifle to get started in this beautiful discipline. The same principles can be used effectively with a .22LR rifle with a $200 scope (although, you won’t get the same kind of range as with larger calibers). What’s most important are solid rifle marksmanship fundamentals. We must endeavor to eliminate, or at least minimize, human error. If your marksmanship skills are flawed, you can go crazy trying to compensate for errors derived not by external variables, but by your hand. In the course of this series, I’ll give you some tips to improve your accuracy . I’ll divide the material into three sections: Theory We will examine the physics behind the behaviour of a projectile (bullet) in flight. It is essential to understand this to be able to predict the bullet’s trajectory in order adjust our sights and hit the target at varying distances and conditions. Weapons System I will discuss the setup of a typical long range weapons system (i.e., rifle, optics, etc.). I’ll also cover how to maximize the accuracy and consistency of your rifle, how to choose the right optic, and how to select the right ammunition. Technique This will be a sort of “how to” section where I’ll take you step by step through long range shooting techniques, starting from zeroing your rifle and building your own ballistic table, and finishing with the observation of the bullet going downrange. If you have studied and practiced well, you will see your bullet hitting your target, like in this example from Shooter. Beef stew before… …and after. Stay tuned! Featured images are stills from Antoine Fuqua’s 2007 film, Shooter.

Summary

The Survival Debate is back.   If you had to choose between the Henry Arms AR-7 Survival Rifle or the Springfield Armory M6 Scout Survival Rifle, which would you choose and why?  Both are great survival rifles but which one will the fans of SurvivalCache pick? Springfield Armory M6 Scout Survival Rifle Pros Limited moving parts – very little to go wrong with this rifle/shotgun Steel construction 2 Barrels / 2 Types of ammo – . 410 shotgun & .